Because everyone wants to feel good about what they put on their skin and in their body, we made it easy to look up each ingredient in every Apriori Beauty product with our online Ingredient Dictionary. Click to find a specific ingredient and to see which products it is in, as well as look-up each product to see its list of ingredients. This dictionary includes the definition of each ingredient and its source, along with any synonyms or relating source studies. If you’re like most ingredient-conscious consumers, it’s a tool you’ll want to bookmark and revisit often


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Elastin - read more

Elastin is a protein that is responsible for the elastic properties of skin. Together with collagen, elastin gives skin its strength and texture. Exposure to UV irradiation significantly degrades skin elastin, resulting in reduced elasticity with age.

Emollient - read more

A common component of moisturizing products, emollients are ingredients that help soften and sooth skin by forming a protective barrier on the skin’s surface that prevents water loss.

Emulsion Stabilizer - read more

Emulsion stabilizers are ingredients that help keep an emulsion (a mixture of unblendable liquids such as oil and water) from separating into its individual components.

Endocrine System - read more

A system of glands that control hormone release throughout the body. Hormones are responsible for regulating a variety of physiological functions, including growth, mood, and metabolism. Hormone fluctuations also contribute to age related changes in skin, such as acne during puberty (when increased hormones increase sebum production), and skin thinning during menopause.

Endocrine System Modulator - read more

An essential part of Apriori Beauty’s NutrientReservoir™, endocrine system modulators are ingredients that naturally promote hormonal balance, and reduce the symptoms of aging associated with hormonal fluctuation. As we age, declining estrogen level cause a decrease in collagen production; the reduction in collagen is a major contributor to the loss of skin elasticity and thickness associated with chronological aging. In addition, hormonal fluctations with age contribute to several inflammatory conditions, including acne breakouts. Endocrine system modulators in the NutrientReservoir include ingredients that naturally mimic hormones, ingredients that reduce the inflammation associated with hormonal changes, and ingredients that promote collagen/elastin production.

Environmental Aging - read more

When considering the aging process and skin, there are two major types of aging to consider, intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Extrinsic aging results when exposure to external factors damages skin, causing premature aging. Numerous factors can negatively affect the skin, the most common of which is sun exposure (extrinsic aging is, therefore, often referred to as photoaging). Other factors include pollution, poor diet, cigarette smoke, stress, and gravity. Exposure results in skin with age spots, blotchy pigmentation, deep wrinkles, and a rough, leathery appearance. Also see intrinsic aging.

Enzyme - read more

Enzyme are proteins that help initiate or accelerate chemical reactions.

Epidermis - read more

The outermost skin layer, the epidermis, provides a waterproof, protective barrier between our internal and external environments. The epidermis is made up of 5 sublayers, the stratum corneum, stratum lucidum, stratum granulosum, stratum spinosum, and stratum basale. The surface sublayer, the stratum corneum, consists of dead, keratin infused, flattened cells that are naturally replaced as new cells are created in the stratum basale and migrate upwards through the epidermis. These “keratinocyte cells” make up a large majority of the dermis, and help skin retain moisture by both preventing evaporation and absorbing water from the environment. The epidermis also houses a variety of specialized cells including melanocytes (produce the pigment, melanin), Langerhans cells (process antigens, immune system support) and Merkel cells (role in creating the sense of touch).

Escobillo (Barbados Cherry) - read more

Escobillo fruit is an excellent source of antioxidants and has very high levels of vitamin C.

Ethylhexyl Isononanoate - read more

Performance ingredient, skin conditioner, emollient

Ethylhexyl Palmitate - read more

A derivative of palm oil often used as an organic replacement for silicone. It is an ultra mild skin smoothing ester.

Ethylhexylglycerin - read more

Performance ingredient, perservative

Euterpe oleraceae - read more

Acai berries, the small, deep purple "super fruit" of the acai palm, contain high concentrations of phytochemicals, antioxidants, essential fatty acids, and amino acids. The wide variety of antioxidant compounds — including anthocyanins and flavonoids — make it one of the most potent antioxidant foods known. These compounds also have valuable anti-inflammatory properties and are effective in promoting immune system function.

Exfoliation - read more

Exfoliation is the process of using mechanical or chemical means to promote skin cell shedding from the epidermis. Mechanical exfoliation involves physically scrubbing dead skin cells from the surface using an abrasive, such as beet sugar crystals in Celloxylin Enzyme Activated Micro Scrub. Commonly used abrasives include plastic beads, salt, sugar, crushed nut shells, pumice, and abrasive sponges or loofahs. Chemical exfoliation involves using chemical means to loosen the bonds that hold dead skin cells to the surface. Alpha-hydroxy and beta-hydroxy acids (such as those used in Celloxylin MD 20EX Acid Peel) are highly effective chemical exfoliators. Natural skin cell sloughing slows significantly as we age, resulting in a buildup of dry, dead cells that can cause clogged pores, discoloration, and skin dullness. Regular exfoliation helps maintain a healthy skin cell turnover rate. For more information see the Apriori Beauty consumer education article, Did You Know? Why Exfoliate?

Extracellular Matrix (ECM) - read more

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the area between cells that provides structural support and aids in numerous biological functions including cell communication, immune system support, moisture retention, and cell movement. Collagen, elastin, and hyaluronic acid are all important components of the extracellular matrix.

Extrinsic Aging - read more

When considering the aging process and skin, there are two major types of aging to consider, intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Extrinsic aging results when exposure to external factors damages skin, causing premature aging. Numerous factors can negatively affect the skin, the most common of which is sun exposure (extrinsic aging is, therefore, often referred to as photoaging). Other factors include pollution, poor diet, cigarette smoke, stress, and gravity. Exposure results in skin with age spots, blotchy pigmentation, deep wrinkles, and a rough, leathery appearance. Also see intrinsic aging.


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